Parties in the Dutch food sector are united to ensure good business management in the international production chain. They today signed the International Responsible Business Conduct (IRBC) for the food sector. The agreement aims to promote cooperation throughout the chain in order to minimise the risk of negative effects such as human rights violations and environmental damage and thus contribute to greater sustainability of the production chain. The Business – Human Rights Resource Centre is at a critical time in its development. Our digital platform contains a wealth of information on the economy and human rights, but it has not been updated visually in recent years. On 19 June 2017, the Dutch gold sector agreed, in collaboration with partners (government, jewellers, recycling companies, shack companies, NGOs and goldsmiths), to work to improve good business management at the international level throughout the gold value chain. The emphasis is on improving transparency. This report presents the results of the evaluation of sectoral agreements on good business governance (hence, the RBC agreements). This evaluation was commissioned by the Dutch Department of Foreign Affairs as part of the Putting Puting Responsible Business Conduct Measures (RBC) Measures in Perspective project to assess and review current RBC policy. The objective of this evaluation is to gain an overview of the extent to which RBC agreements are advancing due diligence implementation, in line with OECD guidelines for multinational enterprises (OECD guidelines) and UN Guidelines on Business and Human Rights (CNUP) in high-risk Dutch sectors. The Responsible Gold Agreement defines what Dutch gold companies and trade associations have agreed with civil society organizations, trade unions and governments.

The aim is to ensure respect for human rights, the environment and biodiversity in the gold value chain. Dutch gold companies will do everything in their power to buy gold from responsible sources. Jewellers and goldsmiths inform their customers in more detail about the origin of their gold. As gold production revenues are used to finance violent conflicts in some countries, the parties have committed to eliminating these risks. The objective of this evaluation is to gain an overview of the extent to which RBC agreements are advancing due diligence, in line with OECD guidelines for multinational enterprises and undac lumber and UN guidelines for business and human rights (CNUP) in high-risk Dutch sectors, such as labour environment, corruption or human rights.