As part of the agreement, the British Parliament repealed the Government of Ireland Act 1920 (which had established Northern Ireland, divided Ireland and claimed a territorial claim over all of Ireland), and the people of the Republic of Ireland amended Articles 2 and 3 of the Irish Constitution, which affirmed a territorial claim to Northern Ireland. But do young people who have never known life without them even know what it is? The Good Friday Agreement (GFA) or Belfast Agreement (Irish: Comhaontú Aoine an Chéasta or Comhaontú Bhéal Feirste; Ulster-Scots: Guid Friday Greeance or Bilfawst Greeance)[1], these are some agreements signed on April 10, 1998 that put an end to most of the violence of the Troubles, a political conflict in Northern Ireland that had arisen since the late 1960s. This was an important development in the peace process in Northern Ireland in the 1990s. The agreement also established a North-South Council of Ministers to bring together Assembly members and their counterparts in Dublin on issues of “mutual interest”. In 2004, negotiations took place between the two governments, the DUP and Sinn Féin, on an agreement on institution-building. These talks failed, but a document published by governments detailing changes to the Belfast Agreement became known as the “Global Agreement”. However, on 26 September 2005, it was announced that the Provisional Irish Republican Army had completely closed and “decommissioned” its arsenal. Nevertheless, many trade unionists, in particular the DUP, remained sceptical. Of the loyalist paramilitaries, only the Loyalist Volunteer Force (LVF) had decommissioned weapons.

[21] Further negotiations took place in October 2006 leading to the St Andrews Agreement. The two main political parties in the deal were the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) led by David Trimble and the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) led by John Hume. The two leaders jointly won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1998. The other parties involved in a deal were Sinn Féin, the Alliance Party and the Progressive Unionist Party. The Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), which later became the largest Unionist party, did not support the deal. She left the talks when Sinn Féin and the loyalist parties joined because republican and loyalist paramilitary weapons had not been downgraded. The overall result of these problems was to damage unionists` confidence in the deal, which was exploited by the anti-deal DUP, which eventually overtook the pro-deal Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) in the 2003 general election. The UUP had already resigned from the executive power-sharing branch in 2002 after the Stormontgate scandal in which three men were accused of gathering intelligence. .